Change My Face
Change My Face provides innovative ageing software allowing people to visualise themselves in the future and showing effects of lifestyle such as drinking, smoking, tanning, diet, stress and pollution. We make software for education, science, health, pensions and HR. Our apps have been no.1 in 16 countries, achieving over 1 million downloads and reaching out to a global audience.

Innovative lifestyle software for adults and children

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Facing the Future

👤 🕔 March 22, 2017 Comments Off on Facing the Future

We are excited to have contributed towards a new installation by the YBA Artist Gillian Wearing who imagines herself as a 70-year-old in series of images unveiled as part of exhibition at National Portait Gallery

Not everyone will want to know what they might look like when they are 70, but the artist Gillian Wearing is more than happy to contemplate it, dozens of times.

The National Portrait Gallery on Wednesday unveiled a huge wall of images called Rock ’n’ Roll 70 Wallpaper showing a digitally aged Wearing in about 30 different situations and clothes.

They include Wearing as a 70-year-old biker girl in a white vest with breast enhancements and tattoos, and a more down-to-earth Wearing in a dowdy yellow sweater posing happily with her real-life partner, Michael Landy, who is also digitally aged.

There is also a triptych comprising an image of Wearing as she is today, one of her digitally aged, and a blank space to be filled in with a photograph when the artist really is 70.

Sarah Howgate, the gallery’s contemporary curator, said Wearing worked closely with forensic scientists for the project. “It is exploring issues which affect us all … ageing, memento mori, the transience of life,” she said.

Gillian Wearing poses in front of the wall of images
Wearing poses in front of the wall of images showing her 70-year-old selves. Photograph: Ray Tang/Rex/Shutterstock

The work is part of a new show opening on Thursday that presents works by Wearing alongside pieces by the early 20th-century French surrealist artist Claude Cahun.

Both are from vastly different backgrounds but there are many parallels between them, hence the reason for the show.

Gillian Wearing and Claude Cahun: Behind the Mask, Another Mask is at the National Portrait Gallery from 9 March to 29 May.

Tech: The Future of Personalised Health Care

👤 🕔 March 1, 2017 Comments Off on Tech: The Future of Personalised Health Care

Change My Face is now working more with start ups who are accessing our age progression software to flag up warning signs about health and for users of their tech to seek out healthier lifestyles as well as screening.  CXA, Connexion Asia   are unlocking wellness in the workplace with a new app that allows users to input information about their health and see their future selves, as well as having access to screening and information.

Image result for cxa app

We are also working with the University of Tokyo which also has funding to develop an app to raise awareness of preventable diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease in Japan – with the emphasis on prevention being better than cure. Personalised medicine, I understand from them, is the future. Stats from the NHS show thousands of people in England could avoid an early death from one of the five most common killers: Cancer, Heart Disease, Stroke, Lung Disease and Liver Disease. A child born today should expect to live a longer, healthier life than ever before. Yet, a Government report, Living Well for Longer (PDF, 1.6Mb), blames the top five killers for more than 150,000 deaths a year among under-75s in England alone and the Department of Health estimates two-thirds of them are entirely avoidable.

This chart shows the premature death toll by illness. Heart disease and stroke are together referred to as cardiovascular disease.

We are fascinated by what lies ahead with regards to modern healthcare such as this futuristic doctor’s surgery innovation project in San Francisco. Could the days be numbered for our outdated doctor’s surgeries? Technology will ultimately supercede and luckily for us the more information we have at our fingertips, smartphone, accessible doctors etc the more pro-active we can be with our own future health.

 

Forward’s rethinking of the doctor’s office includes lots of touch screens, white walls, and wood accents.

Rachel Metz writes…imagine if your doctor’s office was more like an Apple Store mashed up with a fancy gym: a modern white-and-wood aesthetic, replete with fancy gadgets and gleaming touch screens, for which you paid a monthly fee to visit as often as you wished.

Forward’s exam rooms are sleek and modern, with a large touch screen on one wall that doctors use to go over patients’ information.

Forward combines a variety of services—you can get help with your high cholesterol, a pap smear, and a vaccine for an upcoming overseas trip—with data gathered both at the office and, via wearable gadgets and Forward’s smartphone app, at home. The clinic has a built-in pharmacy; the first round of any drugs your Forward doctor prescribes is free. And blood tests that can be performed and quickly analyzed on site are included, too, as are any wearable gadgets the doc wants to send home with you. It does not accept health insurance.

Forward founder and CEO Adrian Aoun says the startup wants to change how patients approach going to the doctor. Most people just make an appointment when they’re sick or have a weird rash. But while you may see a doctor once or twice a year, “your body hasn’t stopped caring about its health in between,” he notes. It’s concierge medicine, Silicon Valley style, for $149 a month.

23 and Me DNA Testing

23 and Me provides DNA kits, a simple mouth swab allows you to unlock pre-determined information from your own DNA and find out how your genetics relate to things like abnormal blood clotting, cystic fibrosis or response to certain medications. Those who buy the kit can also see if their body metabolises caffeine quickly or if you’re likely lactose intolerant. 23andMe in the UK believe the more you know about your DNA, the more you know about yourself.

23andme

 

Mirror Mirror

👤 🕔 March 1, 2017 Comments Off on Mirror Mirror

Mirror, mirror on the wall. Who’s the geekiest of them all? Get ready for this, fairy tale enthusiasts and technology lovers, because the magic mirror has just gone digital. Cybertecture combines the traditional form and function of a mirror with the programmable apps and clean digital display of our favorite gadgets.

Connected wirelessly to the internet and utilizing a user-friendly interface, this incredibly intuitive product allows you to get the information you need while performing its duty as a completely functional mirror. The possibilities are as diverse as they are exciting. Watch TV while blow-drying your hair. Read the news while brushing your teeth. Check Facebook while washing your face.

Moving on, could your magic mirror be a health tool that recognises that your blood sugar is low, or that you cholesterol is on the up? Maybe you can see your face in 10 years ‘ time according to your lifestyle, or perhaps you’ve given up smoking and want to see how much better you’re going to age?

And if the extra displays get distracting, you can always switch the mirror to passive mode and it will simply be a slick reflective surface for you to style your hair or perform your beauty routine. You control the device either with a remote or via your smartphone. It comes with a sensor pad to allow you to track your health vitals, so that you can check up on yourself and the world around you from a single location.

For the full article click here

Futuristic aging for COSI Science Center

👤 🕔 November 15, 2016 Comments Off on Futuristic aging for COSI Science Center

Almost completed, a multi tasking exhibit to visiulise your future self for the COSI Science Center in Ohio, with effects of smoking, alcohol, drugs, tanning, stress and diet. We’ve really loved working on this project and had great feedback so far:

 

“The software is installed and works like a charm. We started playing around with the software in our exhibition space, and it looks great!  If guests have half as much fun with it as we did it will be a huge hit.  Thanks so much for all of you and your team’s work on the program. The aging effects work wonderfully.  I especially like the ability to get in at the end and re-adjust my selections—it’s not only fun, but I think it really helps get the specific content points across.  Kudos.” Josh Kessler, COSI

 

 

Meet Your Future Self

👤 🕔 November 11, 2016 Comments Off on Meet Your Future Self

We are proud to have created an app for Visa showing the youth of today that depending on how much they save for the future, this could have a negative effect on their wallets, quality of life and looks. Maybe it stands to reason, that if you retire on a measly pension and have little to live off, there’s a chance life could be more stressful, more stress leads to less sleep, a poorer diet etc etc. Plus, an experiment proved that if you could meet your future self, and connect with that image, then you are more likely to put away more pennies for the future. Pensions companies are latching on to this nugget of research to persuade people to save more when they are young – and by using age progression to visualise your future self, maybe you’ll save a little more too? For age progression & financial calculator apps, email us info@changemyface.com

 

Looking into the Future

👤 🕔 September 9, 2016 Comments Off on Looking into the Future

We’re really excited to be working on some new age progression software for Ohio Science Center – the first ever interactive to show how you’ll look with the effects of stress, alcohol, smoking, diet, excercise and drugs combined – a scary thought indeed – luckily you can make lifestyle changes at the end to ‘improve’ your look. The first piece of interactive software we made for scientific purposes was for the Glasgow Science Centre, and was named the 10 Year Time Machine – showing the effects of drinking and smoking – a fun and slightly shocking interactive that has proved very popular since first being used 4 years ago. We love doing our work…

Sugar Face..what effects our lifestyle choices can have on our looks

👤 🕔 May 25, 2016 Comments Off on Sugar Face..what effects our lifestyle choices can have on our looks

By LYNSEY CLARKE

08:20, 14 May 2016

SUGAR can age the skin as much as smoking and boozing, new evidence claims.

Experts have dubbed the effects of too much sweetness sugar face, saying it reduces elasticity in the skin and can cause wrinkles.

Here, forensic medical artist Auriole Prince uses The Suns LYNSEY CLARKE, 31, to show through age progression what ten more years of sugar, coffee, smoking, booze and using computers could do to her complexion.

Consultant dermatologist and British Skin Foundation spokesperson Dr Nisith Sheth explains the problems.

Normal face

Copyright STEWART WILLIAMS 07956 568150 SUN WOMAN. Lynsey Clarke Ageing. Pictures of Lynsey will be digitally aged to reflect the damage done by continually living different life styles 11/5/16

Sugar face

Copyright STEWART WILLIAMS 07956 568150 SUN WOMAN. Lynsey Clarke Ageing. Pictures of Lynsey will be digitally aged to reflect the damage done by continually living different life styles 11/5/16

Dark circles, spots, open pores, wrinkles, sun damage.

Dr Sheth says: There is evidence to suggest that the glycation process, which is caused by high blood sugar, worsens ageing by causing wrinkles and fine lines.

There is also some evidence that high GI foods – fast release sugars such as sugary drinks or sweets – can make acne worse AND make the skin oily.

Lynseys verdict: Thank God I prefer savoury to sweet. I gave up chocolate for Lent this year and seeing what sugar could do to my skin has made me consider cutting it out for good.

I knew that eating cakes and biscuits could cause the odd spot but I had no idea about the wrinkles.

Booze face

Jowls, swollen salivary glands, broken veins, rosacea, dehydration, bloodshot eyes, wrinkles.

Dr Sheth says: Alcohol causes dilation of the blood vessels, which in turn causes flushing and rosacea, permanent redness and spots.

Lynseys verdict: I am partial to a glass of wine so seeing what it can do has terrified me. The red cheeks and bloated neck are especially unattractive.

Smoking face

Copyright STEWART WILLIAMS 07956 568150 SUN WOMAN. Lynsey Clarke Ageing. Pictures of Lynsey will be digitally aged to reflect the damage done by continually living different life styles 11/5/16

Lines and wrinkles, leathery skin, dull complexion, tramlines above lip, more prominent scarring.

Dr Sheth says: Caffeine can open blood vessels and for some this causes a rosy complexion.

Lynseys verdict: “My face has lost any plumpness and looks really gaunt and sallow. It’s enough to put anyone off sparking up.”

Coffee face

Heightened stress spots or breakouts, dehydrated skin, rosy cheeks, dark circles.

Dr Sheth says: Caffeine can open blood vessels and for some this causes a rosy complexion.

Lynseys verdict: I am of the flat white generation and enjoy a frothy coffee each day but I try to balance it out with lots of water. Coffee certainly doesnt have the worst effects on the skin but I wont overdo it.

Computer face

Turkey tech-neck, drooping jowls, frown lines, wrinkles around eyes

Dr Sheth says: Looking at a screen all day could increase wrinkles and being inside an air-conditioned office for long periods can dry out the skin.

Lynseys verdict: The effect the use of technology has around my neck and eyes worries me. I had no idea air-conditioning dehydrated the skin.

Original photos taken by Stewart Williams

Stressful lives can age us by 5 years

👤 🕔 May 25, 2016 Comments Off on Stressful lives can age us by 5 years

Interesting to read that new research from New Zealand has shown that our stressful lifestyles are ageing us beyond our years.

Whether it’s work pressure, financial stress or spending too much time looking after the needs of others, our own health is coming second.

A study, commissioned by insurance company Sovereign, shows at the extreme end, our lifestyle and stress can even add 20 “penalty years” of age.

Penalty years are added through a “health age generator” that assesses everything from exercise to sleep patterns and drinking habits.

So, a 40-year-old with five penalty years, has effectively aged themselves into a 45-year-old.

Overall, the generator revealed that in the 1200 Kiwis surveyed, there was a national average of two penalty years.

Men fared better than women, averaging 1.2 penalty years against 2.2, while penalty years decreased in older Kiwis.

NZ Warriors and former All Blacks doctor John Mayhew said the research marked a national “line in the sand”.

“The main factors seen to be impacting the health age average are work, stress, risky behaviour – like unsafe driving or poor sunsmart choices – and alcohol consumption,” said Dr Mayhew, who is Sovereign’s chief medical officer.

Steven Cook – missing person

👤 🕔 December 17, 2015 Comments Off on Steven Cook – missing person

On 22nd June 2015 we released an updated age progression of missing person Steven Cook.

Steven Cook went missing in Malia, Crete, on the night of 31st August / September 1st 2005 on the first day of his holiday. Thewebsite his family have created is dedicated to bringing Steve home, telling people about their search for Steve, his possible circumstances, and informing anybody that is going to holiday in crete, or knows someone that may live there, how they can help to bring Steven home through sparing just a few minutes of their time whilst there.

Below are photos of Steven before he went missing.

 

The Future is Looking Bad

👤 🕔 November 15, 2011 Comments Off on The Future is Looking Bad
A look into the future ... junk food-addict Amy Barrett Singh

A look into the future … junk food-addict Amy Barrett Singh

The future is… looking BAD

MUNCHING junk food, smoking and too many glasses of Merlot are all terrible for our health.

However, when you’re young there is often little visible evidence of the damage being done.

So NIKKI WATKINS met three girls in their early twenties who eat, smoke or drink too much.

With the help of computer wizardry (find out more at changemyface.com) we have shown them how their choices will reflect in their faces in ten years’ time.

And Sun Doctor Carol Cooper and The Harley Street Skin Clinic’s Lesley Reynolds Khan give their advice to our shocked trio.

 

The junk food eater

 

 

AMY Barrett Singh, 25, a teaching assistant from Tamworth, Staffs, eats calorie-laden junk food nearly every day.

Evening meals over a fortnight included curly fries, two frozen pizzas, a McDonald’s meal with a milkshake, breaded chicken, chip-shop food, two pub roast dinners, a chicken pasty and a veg pasty, Domino’s takeaway pizza, fishfingers, a microwaved fish pie, garlic bread and vegetable samosas.

This is alongside her lunches and snacks of biscuits, cakes, crisps and chocolate. She says:

“I know I have a bad diet, but I never meant for it to be that way.

“When I was younger my mum and brothers ate meat, so when they had their food I would make myself vegetarian food that was easy and convenient.

“When I moved out of home, I was also caring for my grandad and I was so busy I would grab quick snacks and quickly got into this bad habit.

“The picture is horrendous.

“I cannot believe this is me aged by just ten years, I could not bear to look like that at 35.

“I hate the wrinkles on my forehead, the crow’s feet around my eyes and the colour of my skin.

“I hate the double chin and bulges of fat by my nose.

“On my original photo I think my skin looks good and the comparison is shocking, showing you can clearly get away with murder in your early twenties.

“I am going to change my life as I can’t look like this in ten years. I am starting a healthy diet. I’m going to start eating more home-cooked foods and will replace my unhealthy snacks with lots of fresh fruit and veg.

“I think I will really notice the savings in money, as takeaways are not cheap. I’m sure my husband will feel much healthier with a new diet too.

“This is the best thing I have ever done as it has really made me think about my nutrition.”

CAROL’S VERDICT: “Junk food is loaded with calories, fat and salt.

“Weight is likely to go up and this kind of diet can raise your blood cholesterol levels and make you metabolise glucose less well.

“You’re more likely to develop diabetes and high blood pressure and even heart disease and a stroke as a result.

“The risk of heart disease depends on how advanced the changes have got by the time the person swaps to a healthier diet.

“If there are a lot of fatty cholesterol deposits, or blood pressure has been very high for a while, some changes in the heart and blood vessels might be irreversible.”

LESLEY’S VERDICT: “Processed foods are packed with fat and additives that can trigger inflammation in the skin and create skin-wrinkling free radicals.

“Expect a dull and lifeless complexion if your diet doesn’t include plenty of antioxidant-rich fresh fruit and green vegetables.

“Junk food is also full of sugar which speeds up the breakdown of elastin and collagen in the skin. This will result in saggy, loose skin and more lines and wrinkles in short, premature ageing.

“Eat foods with a low GI index, which means swapping white bread, pasta and rice for wholegrains and steer clear of sweets and puddings.”

The boozer

The demon drink ... left-hand picture shows how booze will affect Emily Leonard
The demon drink … left-hand picture shows how booze will affect Emily Leonard

PICTURE framer Emily Leonard, 24, from Kings Lynn in Norfolk, drinks an average of 24.5 units of alcohol a week ten units or one bottle of wine over the Government’s recommendation of 14. She says:

“I started drinking aged 15 on weekends and when I went to university we drank a disgusting amount.

“My alcohol intake has been cut down from my student days.

“Now I drink mainly at the weekends and the odd week night, because it seems the norm.

“I don’t really think about it. I was shocked by the picture.

“I know I should cut down and this definitely scares me.

“I hate the chubby face, how my eyes look small and saggy and the redness.

“I don’t want to look back when I’m in my thirties and wish I hadn’t drunk that much.”

CAROL’S VERDICT: “While it may take years to damage the liver, you can expect it to raise blood pressure within months, so it can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

“The 24.5 units is enough to lower the chances of conceiving, increase the risk of miscarriage and increase the risk of breast cancer.

“Booze also thins the bones. Plus it is a depressant, so it can affect mood, and impact on relationships.

“Stopping drinking reduces high blood pressure, often within weeks.

“Severe liver damage is permanent but, with minor changes, improvements can often be seen within two months.”

LESLEY’S VERDICT: “Alcohol dilates blood vessels which can show up as thread veins on the face.

“If Emily continues her lifestyle this is one of the problems she will most probably encounter.

“Alcohol can also cause rosacea which causes the skin to look red and flushed.

“She can also expect to develop more lines and wrinkles as her skin will be continually dehydrated.”

The smoker

 

Terrible for your health ... smoker Lauren O'Reilly was shocked by the projection

Terrible for your health … smoker Lauren O’Reilly was shocked by the projection

LAUREN O’Reilly, 23, smokes 80 cigarettes a week. The purchasing assistant from Purley, Surrey, admits she wants to cut back as she realises the habit has terrible health implications. She says:

“I know that smoking is terrible for my health and I’ve been doing it since I was 15. I want to give up, so maybe seeing what my face will look like in ten years will push me in the right direction.

“The picture is really horrible, I look 20 years older rather than ten.

“The lines strike me first, and the crow’s feet around my eyes are so dramatic. My skin looks grey and I hate the wrinkles around my neck.

“I know I can look better than that if I quit smoking, so this will be the motivation I need.”

CAROL’S VERDICT: “Smoking 80 cigarettes a week is bound to impact on health.

“Young smokers have a five times higher risk of a heart attack. Heavy smoking causes bronchitis, emphysema, lung cancer, mouth and throat cancer, bladder and stomach cancer.

“Smokers can have trouble conceiving and are more likely to develop complications in pregnancy. Women who smoke go through the menopause at an earlier age and are more likely to get brittle bones.

“Smoking is also linked with gum disease and tooth loss.

Stopping smoking begins to reduce the risk of heart disease within days, and the benefits continue.”

LESLEY’S VERDICT: “The best beauty advice for anyone who smokes is to give up immediately.

“After sun damage, smoking is one of the main environmental factors causing premature ageing.

“Smoke affects the flexibility of skin, leading to lines and a thick, leathery texture.

“Nicotine narrows the blood vessels in the skin, depriving it of oxygen.

“The good news is even people who have smoked for many years, show less facial lines and improve skin tone once they quit.”

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